A body without a voice: a literary approach to Linguet's opposition to the physiocrats over the free trade in grain

Abstract : Linguet was a critic of the physiocrats and of what he perceived as the disastrous consequences the liberalisation of the trade in grain on the people. Linguet's rhetorical use of the voice of the people is studied here through its rhetorical device and its fantasmatic and ideological echoes. With his dramatised and polyphonic style Linguet quotes many different protagonists, but he chooses to neuter the people's voice on the rare occasions when it is heard. Despite this rather conventional suppression of the people's voice, Linguet's claims to be a spokesman or advocate of the people are quite convincing. Through his detailed and hyperbolic depiction of the physical suffering of starving people, Linguet shines a light on one of the blind spots of the Physiocratic doctrine which sees no damage in economic prosperity.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2015, Antiphysiocratic Perspectives in Eighteenth-Century France, 22 (3), pp.420-444
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https://hal.univ-rennes2.fr/hal-01613208
Contributeur : Laurence Leroux <>
Soumis le : lundi 9 octobre 2017 - 14:07:12
Dernière modification le : lundi 26 mars 2018 - 15:22:06

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  • HAL Id : hal-01613208, version 1

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Florence Magnot-Ogilvy. A body without a voice: a literary approach to Linguet's opposition to the physiocrats over the free trade in grain. European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis (Routledge), 2015, Antiphysiocratic Perspectives in Eighteenth-Century France, 22 (3), pp.420-444. 〈hal-01613208〉

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