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Nondecomposable idiom understanding in children: Recursive theory of mind and working memory.

Abstract : Which skills are required to start understanding ambiguous, unfamiliar nondecomposable idioms in context? In this study, we examined the contributions of both second-order false-belief understanding and working memory to the understanding of unfamiliar nondecomposable idioms in children aged 6, 7 and 8 years old. We assumed that, in order to process these idioms, children would have to be able to (a) take a double perspective (Perner & Wimmer, 1985), (b) maintain both literal and figurative meanings as being different from the expression itself, and (c) take the context into account. Six-, 7- and 8-year-old children performed three, second-order false-belief tasks and three working-memory tasks, and listened to 15 nondecomposable idioms inserted into a context, before performing a multiple-choice task. Results indicated that nondecomposable idiom understanding was explained by theory-of-mind skills
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https://hal.univ-rennes2.fr/hal-01712238
Contributor : Laurence Leroux <>
Submitted on : Monday, February 19, 2018 - 11:52:21 AM
Last modification on : Friday, June 19, 2020 - 6:28:00 PM

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Stéphanie Caillies, Sandrine Le Sourn-Bissaoui. Nondecomposable idiom understanding in children: Recursive theory of mind and working memory.. Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology, Canadian Psychological Association, 2013, 67 (2), pp.108 - 116. ⟨10.1037/a0028606⟩. ⟨hal-01712238⟩

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