De Verdun à la Kaaba ! Les pèlerinages à La Mecque des empires alliés pendant la Première Guerre mondiale

Abstract : Not only was the Arab Revolt, launched in October 1916 in the Hedjaz by Sharif Husayn, decisive to the outcome of World War I from a military standpoint, it also marked the unexpected return of civilian circulation on the Red Sea. Indeed, after two years interruption due to the war, Muslim pilgrims from India and Africa were back on the road to Mecca. Contrary to their more restrictive policies before the war, the French were the first to organize an official pilgrimage to the Muslim holy sites, while the British, soon followed by the Italians, abandoned their previous policy of religious neutrality to better imitate and one-up the French initiative. For the Allied empires, this was about declaring their support to the Arab Revolt and while the 1916 pilgrimage does serve propaganda purposes, it also takes on unprecedented military and diplomatic importance. As such, these three war pilgrimages, while establishing British hegemony over the Hejaz, also confirm the growing encroachment of colonial empires in regulating pilgrimage flows.
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Submitted on : Monday, November 18, 2019 - 12:02:58 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, November 19, 2019 - 1:28:02 AM

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Luc Chantre. De Verdun à la Kaaba ! Les pèlerinages à La Mecque des empires alliés pendant la Première Guerre mondiale. Arabian Humanities, Centre Français d’Archéologie et de Sciences sociales de Sanaa (CEFAS), 2016, ⟨10.4000/cy.3156⟩. ⟨hal-02367994⟩

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