Ordre et influence : de la réalité des conduites sociales à leurs interprétations individualistes fallacieuses. Retour sur l’expérience de Milgram et son interprétation

Abstract : The influence of others is often considered as a brief interference that produces negative effects : perceptions are apparently disrupted, judgments are distorted and the subject itself is annihilated (whereas before it was independent, it becomes an automaton or an agent). The author assumes that these conceptions are misinterpretations that mask the real causality of orders or suggestions—similarity and interdependence between the subject and others—by revealing, on the contrary, two independent entities that appear to become abruptly connected by a “magic force” : influence. These representations are individualistic interpretations of social acts—interpretations that are based on the distribution and attribution mechanisms of the parties of the social act in relation to certain individuals. Rather than seeing the necessary—produced jointly—everyone sees the contingent : Who did what ? Who influences whom ? And so on. Influence connects a posteriori these entities that were incorrectly thought to be independent.
Mots-clés : Conduites sociales
Document type :
Journal articles
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Submitted on : Friday, April 27, 2018 - 1:35:48 PM
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Stéphane Laurens. Ordre et influence : de la réalité des conduites sociales à leurs interprétations individualistes fallacieuses. Retour sur l’expérience de Milgram et son interprétation. Les cahiers Internationaux de Psychologie Sociale, Éd. de l'Université de Liège, 2015, 105 (1), pp. 7 - 32 ⟨10.3917/cips.105.0007⟩. ⟨hal-01780293⟩

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